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Aiding Taiwan's art dealers in the global art ecosystem
Ju Ming's 2.04-meter-tall bronze sculpture "Living Whip" was sold for US$158,143 at Christie's auction house in Hong Kong in 2009. It is now estimated to worth more than US$190,000.
Ju Ming's 2.04-meter-tall bronze sculpture "Living Whip" was sold for US$158,143 at Christie's auction house in Hong Kong in 2009. It is now estimated to worth more than US$190,000.
Date:
2014-08-05

To assist Taiwan’s art dealers with their copyright and brokerage duties, the Ministry of Culture has subsidized a total of 60 art associations and galleries between 2012 and 2014 to partake in international trade fairs and contemporary art shows.

Taiwan boasts many individuals who enjoy a high visibility and demand in the global art market, including sculptor Ju Ming (朱銘) and his influential “Living World” series, and artist Liu Kuo-sung (劉國松), who pioneered the modern Chinese ink painting movement.

However, their success also hinge on proper representation in the international arena by brokers and art dealers. By balancing their portfolio and combining young talent with established names, art galleries work to introduce new art items to the primary art market and resell existing pieces in the secondary art market.

To assist Taiwanese contemporary art attain higher valuation and coverage, the Ministry has funded local art dealers and gallery representatives in attending the likes of Art Basel HK, Art Stage Singapore, the Asia Contemporary Art Show in Hong Kong, the Shanghai Art Fair, and Art 14 London.

Eleven galleries were chosen in 2012, thirteen establishments were selected during 2013, and a total of 36 operators and associations have already received financial reimbursement in the first half 2014. The subsidies range from NT$80,000 to NT$1 million (US$2,700 ~ US$33,300) and is meant to cover travel and transportation expenses and participation fees, among other costs.  

As middlemen who connect fine art with serious buyers, art galleries can take Taiwan’s burgeoning visual arts industry to the next level. In light of their importance in the global art ecosystem, the Ministry will continue to hold two open calls per year for proposals concerning art trade attendances.

All art houses and galleries legally registered in Taiwan are welcomed to submit their applications before Oct. 30, 2014. More information can be found in the Chinese-language documents posted here.

One of the Taiwanese artists most favored by modern collectors is painter Liu Kuo-sung, whose "Midnight Sun" sold for approximately US$809,869 in 2013. Another of his painting, "Sun and Moon: Floating? Sinking?" pictured above, is currently part of the British Museum's collection.
One of the Taiwanese artists most favored by modern collectors is painter Liu Kuo-sung, whose "Midnight Sun" sold for approximately US$809,869 in 2013. Another of his painting, "Sun and Moon: Floating? Sinking?" pictured above, is currently part of the British Museum's collection.
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